Ghee!!!! I just like saying it.

So the latest addition to my cooking and diet is Ghee! Ghee’s origins are from India and Pakistan. Ghee has proven is more beneficial in cooking and healthier than butter.

In cooking, it has a very high smoking point (485˚F) due to the fact that it does not contain milk solids like that of butter. This high smoking point makes it superior for baking, sautéing and frying. Butter reaches its smoking point around 350˚F. Some clarified butters come close, but top out around 475˚F.

Ghee is healthier than butter because it is rich in butyrate, short chain fatty acids that are produced by bacteria in the colon. These fatty acids are known to improve digestion and reduce inflammation in the colon.1 It also contains no lactose or casein, so it’s great for anyone with those allergies as an alternative to butter.

Some people will argue that there is no difference between clarified butter and Ghee. Although very similar, there are slight differences. Ghee is a more pure extraction of the oil from butter. When making Clarified butter, the butter is boiled until the majority of the milk solids float to the top and are then skimmed off and only partially removed. With Ghee, the butter cooks until milk solids float to the bottom, burn and are then sieved from the oil giving it a slightly nuttier flavor than clarified butter. This process removes practically all milk solids and because of the longer boil, more moisture boils off, making it purer.

You can find Ghee at Whole Foods® Market and most other specialty food markets if you have any in the area. Or you can make your own! I decided to make my first batch a couple of weeks ago. It’s super easy to make. Here’s the process if you want to give it a try.

 

GHEE (16 oz.)

YOU WILL NEED:

Small saucepan

1 lb. unsalted butter (I used organic, but it will work with any unsalted butter)

Cheesecloth (or I’ve also seen people use coffee filters)

Sieve

2 Half pint canning jars (or any other jar that can be made airtight)

 

DIRECTIONS:

chopped_butter

First let butter soften at room temperature just enough to make it easy to cut. Then cut it into 1/2-1″ cubes. Do this so the butter melts and cooks more evenly to start. Add the butter to the saucepan over medium heat and bring to a simmer. Once at a simmer, turn heat down to medium low.

step1_foam

You’ll see white foam start to form on the top. The foam will become thinner and the bubbles eventually increase in size.

The milk solids will start to cling to the sides of the pan. Just scrape them off now and then to help them sink to the bottom. Continue scraping the sides and bottom until the bubbles subside and the milk solids have all sunk to the bottom.

step2_biggerbubbles

As the milk solids start to fall, you will see the butter will begin to clear. The butter will take on a gold color as the milk solids begin to brown. Keep scraping and stirring the bottom and sides to prevent the solids from attaching to the pan and burning.

step3_finalfoam

Soon you’ll see new large bubbles start to form and then you’ll see the bubbles start turning to foam for a second time. After this happens, your Ghee is ready to remove from the heat.

step4_cheesecloth

Line the sieve with cheesecloth and place it over a glass measuring cup or bowl with a pour spout. Pour the ghee through the sieve. You will see the browned milk solids being removed by the cheesecloth. You can throw this away.

step5_jarring

Once you have strained your Ghee, it is now ready to transfer to your jar.

 
NOTE: Well-prepared ghee does not need refrigeration because it has low moisture content. It can keep in an airtight container for 2-3 months or in the refrigerator for up to a year.

Ghee
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Ingredients
  1. 1 lb. unsalted butter (I used organic, but it will work with any unsalted butter)
Instructions
  1. First you will need a small saucepan, cheesecloth, a sieve and 2 half pint canning jars.
  2. First let butter soften at room temperature just enough to make it easy to cut.
  3. Then cut it into 1/2-1″ cubes. Do this so the butter melts and cooks more evenly to start.
  4. Add the butter to the saucepan over medium heat and bring to a simmer.
  5. Once at a simmer, turn heat down to medium low.
  6. You’ll see white foam start to form on the top. The foam will become thinner and the bubbles eventually increase in size.
  7. The milk solids will start to cling to the sides of the pan. Just scrape them off now and then to help them sink to the bottom.
  8. Continue scraping the sides and bottom until the bubbles subside and the milk solids have all sunk to the bottom.
  9. As the milk solids start to fall, you will see the butter will begin to clear. The butter will take on a gold color as the milk solids begin to brown.
  10. Keep scraping and stirring the bottom and sides to prevent the solids from attaching to the pan and burning.
  11. Soon you’ll see new large bubbles start to form and then you’ll see the bubbles start turning to foam for a second time.
  12. After this happens, your Ghee is ready to remove from the heat.
  13. Line the sieve with cheesecloth and place it over a glass measuring cup or bowl with a pour spout.
  14. Pour the ghee through the sieve.
  15. You will see the browned milk solids being removed by the cheesecloth. You can throw this away.
  16. Once you have strained your Ghee, it is now ready to transfer to your jar.
Notes
  1. Well-prepared ghee does not need refrigeration because it has low moisture content. It can keep in an airtight container for 2-3 months or in the refrigerator for up to a year.
instinctiveeats.com http://www.instinctiveeats.com/

 

1 Zimmerman, M. A.; Singh, N; Martin, P. M.; Thangaraju, M; Ganapathy, V; Waller, J. L.; Shi, H; Robertson, K. D.; Munn, D. H.; Liu, K (2012). “Butyrate suppresses colonic inflammation through HDAC1-dependent Fas upregulation and Fas-mediated apoptosis of T cells”. AJP: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology 302 (12): G1405–15. Doi: 10.1152/ajpgi.00543.2011. PMC 3378095. PMID 22517765.

 


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